How Much Does Being a Surrogate Cost?

You know that all gestational carriers have the right to receive base compensation for their services.

But, you may be wondering: What about all of the medical and pregnancy-related expenses along the way? Will I be responsible for those?

These are important questions to ask, and we are here to answer them. We know the cost of being a surrogate mother can give many prospective surrogates pause, especially when they find out how much intended parents typically pay for this family-building process.

Below, find out some more information about the cost to be a surrogate mother in the U.S. today. For more personalized information on this topic, feel free to reach out to a surrogacy professional now.

Do You Have to Pay to Be a Surrogate Mother?

The good news? If you’re worried about the financials of being a surrogate, you have no reason for concern — your surrogate mother expenses will always be covered by your intended parents and surrogacy professional. Surrogacy will always be free to you.

By becoming a surrogate, you will already give a great deal of your time and energy. Surrogacy professionals make sure you don’t have to give financially, too. You and your family will always be protected from the financial stresses of the legal and medical surrogacy processes. You do not have to pay to be a surrogate mother.

Surrogacy professionals do this for several reasons, but mostly to ensure you can pursue your surrogacy dreams without worrying about the cost to your family. Not every woman is eligible to be a surrogate but, for those women who can, surrogate mother expenses should not prevent them from achieving their dreams.

When you become a surrogate, your surrogacy professionals will ensure the following costs are covered by them or your intended parents:

  • Medical procedures
  • Hospital stays
  • Maternity clothes
  • Travel costs
  • Childcare
  • Lost wages
  • And more

These costs of being a surrogate will all be detailed in your surrogacy contract. That’s why it’s so important to choose an experienced surrogacy attorney who is knowledgeable in these costs and will make sure every little thing is covered.

So, if you are asking, “How much does it cost to become a surrogate mother?” know that the answer is nothing — just the desire and dedication to help someone else become a parent.

What’s the Standard Fee to Be a Surrogate Mother?

On the other hand, when you ask, “How much to be a surrogate?” you may be asking about another financial aspect: surrogate base compensation.

When you become a surrogate, you can receive more than just reimbursement for your surrogate mother expenses. You can receive base compensation paid directly to you, to do with as you wish. These are funds that you and your family may use to achieve a financial goal, such as a down payment on a house or a new car.

So, what are the standard fees for being a surrogate?

Before we get into that, you need to realize that every surrogacy journey is different. Every surrogate’s compensation rate will be different, too. Compensation rates are determined by many things, including a surrogate’s state of residence and her surrogacy experience.  The best way to determine your compensation rate will be by speaking with a local surrogacy professional.

That said, the majority of surrogates in the U.S. are paid an average of $30,000 for their services. Some states (like California) will have higher compensation rates, and some agencies will advertise misleadingly higher rates, so make sure to do your research before choosing an agency simply based on numbers.

Compensation rates are only one aspect of finding the perfect surrogacy professional. But, a surrogacy professional should always be transparent regarding their compensation packages, so you can make the best decision for you and your family.

The Emotional and Physical Costs of Being a Surrogate

When most women think about the costs of being a surrogate, they focus on the financial aspect of it. But it’s just as important that surrogate candidates consider the other costs of this journey — the emotional and physical costs.

Surrogacy, while extremely rewarding, can be a hard process. A surrogate must sacrifice a great deal of her time and energy to help intended parents build their family. She must be ready for a plethora of doctor’s appointments, a relationship with the intended parents, and an overall commitment to the process. Surrogacy can take a year or more, so it’s not a decision to make lightly.

If you are thinking about being a surrogate, consider the non-financial aspects, as well. Are you really prepared for the potential challenges of the process? These can include:

  • The physical toll of pregnancy and childbirth: You’ll be familiar with these experiences because of your prior pregnancies, but remember that every pregnancy is unique. Will you be ready if your pregnancy is harder than your previous ones? If you are put on bedrest during the last month? Think about everything that could happen and how you might feel should it come to be.
  • The commitment required from your family: Your surrogacy journey won’t affect just you. Your family will need to prepare for what the journey requires of them. Your spouse and children will need to take up some of your household responsibilities during your pregnancy, and you’ll need to consider childcare while you attend appointments and other meetings. Make sure your family is 100 percent supportive of your surrogacy before you get started.
  • The emotions of carrying a child who isn’t yours: Most surrogates see their journey as “babysitting” for the intended parents, and they experience no grief or loss after the baby goes home with the intended parents. However, remember that you will be experiencing all kinds of postpartum emotions that can mess with your rational mind. Don’t forget that pre- and post-partum depression is always a risk, too.

So, the next time you ask, “How much is it to be a surrogate mother?” we encourage you to research all aspects of the surrogacy journey — not just the financial. After all, there is so much more involved in being a surrogate than compensation. Only after understanding all of these aspects can you decide whether surrogacy is right for you.

For more information about the emotional, physical and financial costs of being a surrogate, please contact a surrogate professional.

ImageSurrogate Compensation

How Much Does Being a Surrogate Cost?

You know that all gestational carriers have the right to receive base compensation for their services.

But, you may be wondering: What about all of the medical and pregnancy-related expenses along the way? Will I be responsible for those?

These are important questions to ask, and we are here to answer them. We know the cost of being a surrogate mother can give many prospective surrogates pause, especially when they find out how much intended parents typically pay for this family-building process.

Below, find out some more information about the cost to be a surrogate mother in the U.S. today. For more personalized information on this topic, feel free to reach out to a surrogacy professional now.

Do You Have to Pay to Be a Surrogate Mother?

The good news? If you’re worried about the financials of being a surrogate, you have no reason for concern — your surrogate mother expenses will always be covered by your intended parents and surrogacy professional. Surrogacy will always be free to you.

By becoming a surrogate, you will already give a great deal of your time and energy. Surrogacy professionals make sure you don’t have to give financially, too. You and your family will always be protected from the financial stresses of the legal and medical surrogacy processes. You do not have to pay to be a surrogate mother.

Surrogacy professionals do this for several reasons, but mostly to ensure you can pursue your surrogacy dreams without worrying about the cost to your family. Not every woman is eligible to be a surrogate but, for those women who can, surrogate mother expenses should not prevent them from achieving their dreams.

When you become a surrogate, your surrogacy professionals will ensure the following costs are covered by them or your intended parents:

  • Medical procedures
  • Hospital stays
  • Maternity clothes
  • Travel costs
  • Childcare
  • Lost wages
  • And more

These costs of being a surrogate will all be detailed in your surrogacy contract. That’s why it’s so important to choose an experienced surrogacy attorney who is knowledgeable in these costs and will make sure every little thing is covered.

So, if you are asking, “How much does it cost to become a surrogate mother?” know that the answer is nothing — just the desire and dedication to help someone else become a parent.

What’s the Standard Fee to Be a Surrogate Mother?

On the other hand, when you ask, “How much to be a surrogate?” you may be asking about another financial aspect: surrogate base compensation.

When you become a surrogate, you can receive more than just reimbursement for your surrogate mother expenses. You can receive base compensation paid directly to you, to do with as you wish. These are funds that you and your family may use to achieve a financial goal, such as a down payment on a house or a new car.

So, what are the standard fees for being a surrogate?

Before we get into that, you need to realize that every surrogacy journey is different. Every surrogate’s compensation rate will be different, too. Compensation rates are determined by many things, including a surrogate’s state of residence and her surrogacy experience.  The best way to determine your compensation rate will be by speaking with a local surrogacy professional.

That said, the majority of surrogates in the U.S. are paid an average of $30,000 for their services. Some states (like California) will have higher compensation rates, and some agencies will advertise misleadingly higher rates, so make sure to do your research before choosing an agency simply based on numbers.

Compensation rates are only one aspect of finding the perfect surrogacy professional. But, a surrogacy professional should always be transparent regarding their compensation packages, so you can make the best decision for you and your family.

The Emotional and Physical Costs of Being a Surrogate

When most women think about the costs of being a surrogate, they focus on the financial aspect of it. But it’s just as important that surrogate candidates consider the other costs of this journey — the emotional and physical costs.

Surrogacy, while extremely rewarding, can be a hard process. A surrogate must sacrifice a great deal of her time and energy to help intended parents build their family. She must be ready for a plethora of doctor’s appointments, a relationship with the intended parents, and an overall commitment to the process. Surrogacy can take a year or more, so it’s not a decision to make lightly.

If you are thinking about being a surrogate, consider the non-financial aspects, as well. Are you really prepared for the potential challenges of the process? These can include:

  • The physical toll of pregnancy and childbirth: You’ll be familiar with these experiences because of your prior pregnancies, but remember that every pregnancy is unique. Will you be ready if your pregnancy is harder than your previous ones? If you are put on bedrest during the last month? Think about everything that could happen and how you might feel should it come to be.
  • The commitment required from your family: Your surrogacy journey won’t affect just you. Your family will need to prepare for what the journey requires of them. Your spouse and children will need to take up some of your household responsibilities during your pregnancy, and you’ll need to consider childcare while you attend appointments and other meetings. Make sure your family is 100 percent supportive of your surrogacy before you get started.
  • The emotions of carrying a child who isn’t yours: Most surrogates see their journey as “babysitting” for the intended parents, and they experience no grief or loss after the baby goes home with the intended parents. However, remember that you will be experiencing all kinds of postpartum emotions that can mess with your rational mind. Don’t forget that pre- and post-partum depression is always a risk, too.

So, the next time you ask, “How much is it to be a surrogate mother?” we encourage you to research all aspects of the surrogacy journey — not just the financial. After all, there is so much more involved in being a surrogate than compensation. Only after understanding all of these aspects can you decide whether surrogacy is right for you.

For more information about the emotional, physical and financial costs of being a surrogate, please contact a surrogate professional.

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